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Rottweiler Dog Breed… Everything You Need to Know at a Glance!

Obviously, he is a BIG fella!

In fact, the Rottweiler Dog breed is a massive one if you really think about it. Plus, on top of their sheer size, their also quite muscular and can be compared to a bouncer at a nightclub.

Now…

Whether he turns out to be a monster of a dog or a gentle giant will depend on his training and socialization or in other words, it’s going to depend on you.  The good news is, that while a Rottweiler can be trained to work as a guard or an attack dog, that’s mainly because of their physical prowess, in truth, these dogs tend to be “natural sweethearts” which is why we here at IndulgeYourPet is so fond of this breed.

So, why a Rottweiler?

The thing about this dog is that he may not like strangers very much, but is incredibly loyal to his human family. He can literally walk on burning coal for you, if he has to.

Yes

…He is big and scary and perhaps not the right choice for a house with small children. He is not exactly a playmate for kids. But like all herding dogs, he has powerful protective instincts.

You can trust this big guy to watch out for the kids when they are playing outside in the lawn or in a park. He is like a big, strong, protective older brother, who makes sure that nothing bad happens to them.

But…

You always need to watch out for any Breed-Specific Legislation against the Rottweiler in your city or state. These laws restrict the ownership of Rottweiler dogs because of an impression that these dogs are aggressive by nature.

The local authorities in North Little Rock, Arkansas, for example, have restricted ownership of Rottweilers by charging a breed-specific licensure fee of $500.00 on them, much higher than for other dog breeds.

Also…

Do your research and find out about the best Rottweiler Breeders in your area. Make sure to get your Rottie puppy from a reputable breeder who runs an ethical breeding program.

But the real…

Question is are you the “right” owner for one of these awesome animals?  That is a question that only you will be able to answer, but hopefully after reading the following article, you’ll have a better idea if you are or not.

Because…

The last thing that we would want to see happen is for you to choose to purchase a Rottweiler puppy or better yet adopt a Rottweiler rescue dog only to find out a few weeks later that you made a terrible mistake!

So, without further ado, let’s dive right in.

Rottweiler Dog Breed Fast Facts

Country of Origin: Germany

Original Purpose:  Cattle driver, and guard dog

Height: 22 to 27 inches

Weight: 75 to 135 pounds

Dog Breed Classification:  Working group

Life Span: 8 to 10 years

Origin of the Rottweiler Dog Breed

 Where did the Rottweiler come from?

The Rottie comes from the town of Rottweil, Germany. He was specifically bred by the local butchers to drive cattle to the market. He was a big and powerful working dog, capable of extreme hard work, never the sort to say no or sulk in a corner.

But where did the Rottie really come from?

The Rottweiler descends from big and powerful herding dogs used by the Roman Army as they marched through Europe. These dogs bred with the local dogs, a result of which was the Rottweiler.

The Rottie

…Has always been used as a military dog or police dog. He played a major role in the World Wars I and II, never mind the fact that he was on the wrong side! The Allgemeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub was formed in 1907.

Rottweiler in the USA

The Rottweiler made his way to the United States in the early 20th century. He was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1931.

The Rottie is one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. He was actually the second most popular breed in the 1990s and early 2000s.

But these days…

Largely because of the new found fascination for small dog breeds, he barely makes it to the top 10.

The top 10 includes hugely Popular Dog Breeds such as the Labrador Retrievers and the German Shepherd Dog.

The Rottweiler Mix has many takers as well. This is a mixed-breed dog developed from crossing the purebred Rottweiler Dog Breed with Pit Bulls.

Physical Characteristics

The Rottweiler is easily recognizable, with his large, muscular body, large head and handsome coat, medium length and usually of the colors black and tan. You couldn’t possibly miss him in a crowd.

He can…

Rise up to a height or 27 inches at the shoulder level and can weigh up to 135 pounds. This is a large breed for sure!

He has triangular ears, black-colored wide nose, tail docked with a double-sided tape, sharp teeth that meet in a scissors dog bite, large head and deep chest.

Grooming

The Rottie does shed a lot. You should brush his coat two or three times a week. Give him a bath whenever you can. Get rid of the loose hair to keep his coat shiny. Clean his ears and remove any wax buildup.

 Personality and Temperament

This is a tough, tough dog – physically and temperamentally.

Indeed, the Rottweiler Dog Breed is so tough that they are used in police work. They make for excellent police dogs and military dogs. They are used as guard dogs or watchdogs to protect large estates and commercial establishments.

 Can you…

Find a Rottweiler that is calm, quiet, friendly and easy going?

Yes, you can – how the Rotties – as they are called – behave depends on their training and early socialization as puppies.

But these are warriors among dogs, they are never going to be like a Labrador puppy or Pug that you want to pet or snuggle with in bed. Rotties are big and powerful guard dogs; that is what nature intended them to be.

They can still be…

Excellent companion dogs, therapy dogs or family dogs; provided you treat them with respect and socialize them at an early age. There is no reason why a well trained Rottie cannot live inside the house as a happy family dog.

Health Problems

Like all large breeds, Rottweilers have a relatively short life expectancy of 8 to 10 years. They are big and strong dogs, but vulnerable to certain health issues such as…

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Elbow Dyplasia
  • Aortic Stenosis
  • Osteochondritis Dissecans
  • Gastric Dilatation-volvulus (GDV), (Bloating)
  • Panosteitis
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Allergies

And while…

Most of these conditions may not be life threatening, they can certainly become quite expensive to deal with particularly if they become recurring issues.

This is why…

We here at IndulgeYourPet also recommend that any new pet owner take a moment and see what it might cost for you to purchase a pet insurance policy for your new animal.

Now will a pet insurance policy be right for everyone?

No, probably not.  But until you fully understand what these policies “will” and “won’t” cover and how much these pet insurance policies cost, how will you know if one might be right for you?

For more information on who we feel currently offers the “best” pet insurance policies out there, we would encourage you to check out our Best Pet Insurance Policies article.

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